Do you know the Truth Behind Some Popular Rolex Myths we often talked about?

It is well known that Rolex plays an important role in the field as the most celebrated luxury watch brand worldwide, at the same time it’s also regarded as one of the most secretive companies in the whole industry. This intriguing juxtaposition has bred an air of mystery surrounding the admiration of Rolex watches which are filled with plenty of myths. Here we conclude some truth behind the fake Rolex myths if you want to know more about Rolex.   rolex
At the beginning, “ticking” watches are normally connected with quartz watches. The seconds hand on a quartz watch moves one position every second (for a total of 60 “jumps” every minute) and does so with a loud “tick” sound. Because most people associate quartz watches with cheap fake watches, they suppose that Rolex never made quartz watches, and that is false. While Rolex not produce quartz watches any long today, it has in the past. For instance, the ref. 5100 with a Beta-21 quartz caliber, the Rolex Oysterquartz watches with in-house quartz calibers, and Cellini quartz watches are all Rolex quartz watches which are surely tick.
On the other hand, the myth is mechanical watches technically also “tick,” despite at a much faster pace, which gives the impression of the seconds hand sweeping around the dial. Powered for modern Rolex watches is self-winding calibers, which operate at 28,000 beats per hour, which is equal to 8 ticks per second. Additionally, you can also check out the wonderful Oysterquartz Day-Date and Oysterquartz Datejust timepieces.
In fact, Rolex spent five years developing in-house quartz calibers after the company decided to abandon the Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH) consortium, of which the task was to create a Swiss-made quartz movement worthy enough for its esteemed 20-brand membership list, including (along with Rolex) Patek Philippe, Omega, Piaget, and others. In a result, it was the Beta-21 quartz caliber that powered the Rolex ref. 5100 (“The Texan”), Patek Philippe 3597, Omega Electroquartz, and more.
But Rolex finally created in-house quartz movements, the Cal. 5035 for the Oysterquartz Datejust and Cal. 5055 for the Oysterquartz Date-Date. It is around just 25,000 Oyster quartz replica watches that were produced from 1977 until 2003 worldwide.
It’s true that Rolex only uses 18k gold today, cast in an on-site foundry, gold and two-tone watches can be also crafted. Rolex even has a proprietary pink gold alloy named Everose which was introduced in 2005. However, the fact was not always like this. If you observe vintage Rolex watches, you’ll find versions in 9k and 14k gold as well. Moreover, Rolex even made gold shell watches at one point, where the stainless steel surfaces are “capped” with a thick gold layer. These are sometimes regarded as “Golden Egg” Rolex watches.
Many luxury watch brands use the casebacks of their timepieces as a canvas to engrave logos, numbers, medallions, and special inscriptions. On the other side, the solid fluted screw-down casebacks of Rolex watches are well-known unadorned. However, it’s totally untrue that Rolex casebacks never have any markings. For example, flip the Milgauss 116400 around, and you’ll see the words “ROLEX OYSTER” and “MILGAUSS” around the periphery. Moreover, on the caseback of Replica Rolex Deepsea watches, you’ll spot “ROLEX OYSTER DEEPSEA” and “SEA-DWELLER 12800 ft=3000 m” text on there. Actually, though vintage Sea-Dweller models have engravings on the back, which include “ROLEX PATENT OYSTER GAS ESCAPE VALVE” and other etchings. As military-issued dive watches, Rolex Submariner Milsub casebacks also had a number of markings to identify themselves. At last, it even has “ORIGINAL ROLEX DESIGN” engraved on some casebacks of Lady Datejust and gold Lady President timepieces.  
This myth comes courtesy of some watch enthusiasts who like to classify Rolex as watch brand that produces simple high-quality timepieces without any complications, which is far from the truth. A “complication” is any function on a watch except telling the time. Complications can be included a straightforward date window, technically impressive chronographs and highly complex annual calendars. Thus, Rolex surely makes complicated watches! Besides all the celebrated Rolex watches with date windows and the iconic Day-Date collection, it should be reminded that Rolex boasts GMT watches, dual time watches, chronograph replica watches, and moon phase watches. Additionally, there are also the newer Yacht-Master II watches quipped with a flyback chronograph, countdown timer, and mechanical memory as well as the highly complex Sky-Dweller annual calendar timepieces.
After know more about the truth behind these popular Rolex myths, I believe it would help you to recognize Rolex deeply in some point, and you may have better idea when you choose the Rolex you really like.